Cover of: Buddhist doctrine of momentariness | Alexander von Rospatt Read Online
Share

Buddhist doctrine of momentariness a survey of the origins and early phase of this doctrine up to Vasubandhu by Alexander von Rospatt

  • 435 Want to read
  • ·
  • 49 Currently reading

Published by F. Steiner Verlag in Stuttgart .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Time -- Religious aspects -- Buddhism.,
  • Buddhism -- Doctrines.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementAlexander von Rospatt.
SeriesAlt- und neu-indische Studien,, 47, Alt- und neu-indische Studien ;, 47.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBQ4570.T5 R67 1995
The Physical Object
Pagination285 p. :
Number of Pages285
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL864678M
ISBN 103515065288
LC Control Number95148558

Download Buddhist doctrine of momentariness

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

The object of the Buddhist doctrine of momentariness is not the nature of time but existence within time. Rather than atomizing time into moments, it atomizes phenomena temporally by dissecting them into a succession of discrete momentary entities. Its fundamental proposition. The object of the Buddhist doctrine of momentariness is not the nature of time, but existence within time. Rather than atomizing time into moments, it atomizes phenomena temporally by dissecting them into a succession of discrete momentary entities. The Buddhist principle of karma and the doctrine of no-soul are very much related to the principle of impermanence or that of momentariness. Hence, the criticism of the principle of . The doctrine of momentariness ought to be a direct corollary of the Buddhist metaphysics. But it is curious that though all dharmas were regarded as changing, the fact that they were all strictly momentary ([email protected]@nika_--i.e. existing only for one moment) was .

The Buddhist doctrine of momentariness: a survey of the origins and early phase of this doctrine up to Vasubandhu Volume 47 of Alt- und neu-indische Studien: Author: Alexander von Rospatt: Publisher: F. Steiner, Original from: the University of Michigan: Digitized: May 8, ISBN: , Length: pages: Subjects. momentariness directly, the soteriological significance of this doctrine remains very limited. This e'Xplains why it only played a marginal role in the wider context of Buddhist spirituality. 3 Development The doctrine of momentariness is postcanonic and may have originated in the first century. It is for the.   This page describes the philosophy of the doctrine of momentariness: a concept having historical value dating from ancient India. This is the sixteenth part in the series called the “buddhist philosophy”, originally composed by Surendranath Dasgupta in the early 20th century. This principle is known as the doctrine of momentariness. The Buddhist principle of karma and the doctrine of no-soul are very much related with the principle of impermanence or that of .

But the Buddhist doctrine of momentariness has a hitch in acceptance of the above position. Even if we accept the position of even the moderate Buddhists, who say that ‘to be' has three moments, birth, stay and destruction, it is not intelligible that the same personality carries the same action-potencies or samskaaras, if it has only a. Reading this book will very likely be a "liberating" experience for anyone who is confused or puzzled by current "mainstream" interpretations of the "consciousness-only school." However, this book is NOT "Buddhism for Dummies." A deeper knowledge of Buddhist shastras -- and of Sanskrit -- is preferable for a full understanding of this study/5(4). The Buddhist doctrine of momentariness: A survey of the origins and early phase of this doctrine up to Vasubandhu (Alt- und neu-indische Studien) [Rospatt, Alexander von] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Buddhist doctrine of momentariness: A survey of the origins and early phase of this doctrine up to Vasubandhu (Alt- und neu-indische Studien)Author: Alexander von Rospatt.   This page describes the philosophy of the doctrine of momentariness and the doctrine of causal efficiency (arthakriyakaritva): a concept having historical value dating from ancient India. This is the seventeenth part in the series called the “buddhist philosophy”, originally composed by Surendranath Dasgupta in the early 20th century.